Academy Award-Winning Actor Martin Landau, Known For 'Mission: Impossible' Dies At 89

Academy Award-Winning Actor Martin Landau, famous for his heading roles in North By Northwest and a 1960s Mission: Impossible TV series, has died. He was 89.

Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images


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Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

Academy Award-Winning Actor Martin Landau, famous for his heading roles in North By Northwest and a 1960s Mission: Impossible TV series, has died. He was 89.

Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

Academy Award-Winning Actor Martin Landau, famous for his heading roles in North By Northwest and a 1960s Mission: Impossible TV series, has died. He was 89.

He died on Saturday of “unexpected complications” during a UCLA Medical Center, his publicist confirmed.

In his seven-decade behaving career, Landau worked with a expel of Hollywood executive greats, including Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen and Tim Burton.

Francis Ford Coppola’s 1988 film Tucker: The Man and His Dream won Landau a Golden Globe Award as good as an Oscar assignment for Best Supporting Actor. The following year, he was nominated for a same Oscar difficulty for portraying philandering ophthalmologist Judah Rosenthal in Woody Allen’s Crimes And Misdemeanors (1989).

It was his purpose as a vivid Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s biopic, Ed Wood, that finally scored him a Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in 1994.

But he was substantially best famous for his three-season run as view representative Rollin Hand in TV’s Mission: Impossible, from 1966-1969.

Hand’s character, billed as “The World’s Greatest Impersonator,” also pinned Landau as a master of costume in a eyes of casting directors, who saw him matched to play a accumulation of roles, records a The New York Times.

Landau also particularly incited down a purpose of scholarship officer, Mr. Spock, heading Star Trek creator Gene Rodenberry to expel his second choice, Leonard Nimoy.

At age 17, a Brooklyn-born actor got his initial pursuit as a journal cartoonist during a New York Daily News. As he told Talk Of The Nation Host Neal Conan in 2010, he quit a News 5 years after to give behaving a shot.

“I was being neat to be a melodramatic caricaturist. And we know if we got that job, I’d never quit. So we quit,” Landau said. “I knew we wanted to go into a theater… we wanted to act.”

In a same interview, a alumnus of a prestigious Actors Studio told an NPR listener that he had never had most difficulty training lines since “I consider of them as thoughts and ideas” that a impression wants to express.

Told by Conan that he lights adult a shade with his smashing smile, “Oh, that’s so good to hear. we mean, we always suspicion it looked like a piano.”

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